Tuesday, 28 November 2017

Why Germans Can Say Things No One Else Can (2) - Notebook of the Night

I just came across the following short text by Thomas Ligotti printed with Ligotti's permission in an interview with Angerhuber and her partner Thomas Wagner. This interview was conducted by Uwe Voehl and was published in Arcana no. 1 (the German magazine of classic and modern speculative fiction). Ligotti is sharing his thoughts on Notebook of the Night: Exzerpte aus "Noctuary" - the German-language audio recording of eleven vignettes from Noctuary performed by both of the above mentioned authors (also in my Angerhuber bibliography).

"Even though I don't know German, I love the sound of the German language...and Thomas's and Eddie's readings of my little stories is thoroughly engaging to my ears. When I listen to Eddie's reading, I have some idea of how Lou Reed must have felt to have the rich and dark voice of Nico singing 'Femme Fatale' and, especially, 'All Tomorrows Parties.' Musically, I think that Thomas's compositions for this CD stand on their own: they are beautifully somber and subtly sinister. They are real music, as opposed to merely sampled loops or sick drones, and have a true musical interest that complements rather then simply supports the readings. I can't fully express my appreciation for the work that Thomas and Eddie have obviously put into this project." 
Today is the first time I read this interview and I think it ties quite well with my previous post. It's also nice to read Ligotti's opinion of Angerhubers and Wagners German-language audio recordings, of which I have been a huge enthusiast ever since I first listened to Notebook of the Night.

Wednesday, 22 November 2017

Why Germans Can Say Things No One Else Can

In relation to Ruinenlust and the German language.

This is what Mark Twain used to think about ...


This is what Sylvia Plath used to think about the language:

“What I didn't say was that each time I picked up a German dictionary or a German book, the very sight of those dense, black, barbed-wire letters made my mind shut like a clam.”
This is what others feel about it:

*(found here, thanks to Quentin S. Crisp)

And this is what Eddie M. Angerhuber's prose (which I am still exploring) makes you feel when read by the author: